The 10 Most Fun Things To Do in Pennsylvania in August

One of the original thirteen colonies of America was Pennsylvania, sometimes known as the Keystone State. By fusing the surname of Admiral Sir William Penn with the Latin term for “woodland,” “Sylvania,” King James II gave it the name. It became a state in 1787, and because of its numerous crucial historical contributions, it is a noteworthy location to visit for history aficionados.

The Declaration of Independence was drafted here; the Liberty Bell rang for the first time, and key American Revolutionary War and American Civil War battlegrounds may be found nearby. With so much history, it only makes sense that Pennsylvania is brimming with fun things to do.

Because August seems to be a great month to visit Pennsylvania every year, there are a variety of sites you can visit, from expansive gardens to elaborate works of architecture, historical structures, museums, and art galleries and institutions. Here is our list of The top 10 most fun things to do in Pennsylvania in August to help with your decision.

Things to do in Pennsylvania in August

The Fallingwater

A byproduct of Fallingwater’s physical appearance is its distinctive name.

It is widely regarded as one of the finest private residences created by renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright, as well as one of his best overall designs, and is also known as the Kaufmann Residence.
It was constructed in 1935 and is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Pennsylvania. It is situated on Bear Run in Steward Township and has a structure that extends over a waterfall.
Building Fallingwater cost $155,000. It combines the beauty of organic building with the beauties of nature to achieve a seamless synergy between the home and its surroundings.

Walnut wood furnishings that cost a total of $4,500 are used inside. The waterfall became an architectural landmark as soon as it was completed and was frequently featured in newspapers and journals. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1966, and the American Institute of Architecture named it the best piece of American architecture in 1991.
The lovely Fallingwater house served as the Kauffman family’s summer residence for a while.

Wright, however, refused to fix the over 50 separate leaks in the ceiling and instead advised them to simply place a bucket under the leaks, which is now advised that the home’s managers follow since the attraction has been available to the public since 1964.
The house, which is the only significant piece of Wright’s art that is accessible to the public, is filled with unique details and parts. The Fallingwater was filled by the Kauffmans with artwork and collections of relics that are still on display for guests today.

The Fallingwater
The Fallingwater

The entire look is composed of folk crafts, sculptures, and even designer furniture. The collection includes a cast-iron Buddha head from 906, a sculpture of the Hindu fertility goddess Parvati from the 8th century, an Austrian-Bohemian Madonna from 1420, as well as Picasso and Diego Rivera collections.
The mansion is decorated with artwork from several countries, including Mexico, Africa, and others, giving visitors a wide variety of vistas.

The Mütter Museum

One of the fascinating things to do in Pennsylvania in August is visit the Mütter Museum, which is a part of the College of Physicians in Philadelphia.

It is a medical museum that has been open since 1858 and is a haven of bizarre, amazing, fascinating, and nauseating medical exhibits, body parts, anatomical anomalies, and other weird and gruesome stuff.
The Mütter Museum has a lot of entertaining items on exhibit, but the majority of them are more peculiarly fascinating.

As an illustration, there are the remains of Harry Eastlack, who passed away as a result of the extremely rare condition known as Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva.

His body’s soft connective tissue ossified due to the condition, fusing his bones together and immobilizing him.

Another example is the Soap Lady, a corpse from the 1800s that had to be removed because of the strange waxy material it had begun to create as it began to decay.

The Mütter Museum
The Mütter Museum

Additionally, there is the skeleton of the tallest person to have ever lived in North America, preserved human fetuses, 2,000 items that were taken from patients’ throats for the Chevalier Jackson Foreign Body Collection, incredibly detailed wax models, conjoined twin skeletons, a piece of John Wilkes Booth’s vertebra, and a plaster cast of the famous Siamese twins, Eng and Chang Bunker.

The 46 microscope slides in this collection include silver particles taken from Albert Einstein’s brain, and they are the most cherished exhibit in the Mütter Museum.

Thomas Harvey, a pathologist, preserved Einstein’s brain from the ashes against his wishes to be cremated. Scientists were finally allowed to inspect it after a protracted battle to keep it.

It was discovered in the 1980s that Einstein had a special brain structure, which may have contributed to or been a result of his brilliance. It is currently one of the state’s top tourist destinations.

The Phipps Conservatory

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania’s Schenley Park is home to the sizable complex known as the Phipps Conservatory. It covers 15 acres, with 14 rooms in the main conservatory building, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Henry Phipps, a real estate and steel mogul who developed it as a gift for the city, presented the area to Pittsburgh in 1893. The major objectives of the Phipps Conservatory are to educate visitors and to make their time there enjoyable. It has 23 gardens, including a rooftop food garden, a children’s garden, and a Japanese garden. It also has a Center for Sustainable Landscapes and, of course, a Victorian-style conservatory glasshouse. Exotic plants of every kind are crammed inside the glasshouse’s 14 chambers at the Phipps Conservatory.

The Phipps Conservatory
The Phipps Conservatory

Included in this are herbs, spices, orchids, palm trees, tropical fruits, ferns, bonsai, and even a desert room with cacti and a conservatory with a tropical forest that seems to be in another country entirely.
There are things to do in Pennsylvania in August for nature enthusiasts, thanks to themed flower presentations, unique events, and a gorgeous chandelier!

The Independence National Historical Park and the Liberty Bell

Independence National Historical Park and its adjacent Liberty Bell are undoubtedly one of the greatest and most well-known tourist destinations in Pennsylvania.
The Declaration of Independence was signed in this park, a remarkably significant spot, and the table that George Washington used is still there for admirers to see.

It is a World Heritage Site as well. Independence Hall, a Georgian edifice constructed of red brick that is open for guided tours by park rangers, is the centerpiece of Independence National Historical Park. Built in 1763, it served as Pennsylvania’s first legislative building.

The Independence National Historical Park and the Liberty Bell
The Independence National Historical Park and the Liberty Bell

After being rung in 1776 to commemorate Independence Day, the two-ton Liberty Bell Center and its renowned crack now rest across the street. Independence Mall, which has been extending north since 1948, is located further on. In addition to the numerous old structures lining the cobblestone pathways, it lays out trails leading to Carpenter’s Hall, Old City Hall, and Congress Hall.

The Carnegie Museum of Natural History

Andrew Carnegie, a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, native and industrialist, created the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in 1896. The researchers who found the first fossils of the dinosaur Diplodocus carnegii lived here. It’s a good time and one of the best places to take the family in Pennsylvania.

You may see displays of minerals, fossils, jewels, animals, and more all over the Carnegie Museum of Natural History. The largest collection of Jurassic dinosaurs on Earth, including the world’s first Tyrannosaurus rex specimen and the only juvenile Apatosaurus fossils, is housed in the museum. Although dinosaurs are the main attraction, there is also information on biology, herpetology, and archeology.

The Carnegie Museum of Natural History
The Carnegie Museum of Natural History

The Dutch Wonderland

Dutch Wonderland, also known as a Kingdom for Kids and located in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, is one of the most entertaining locations to visit if you have kids. It is a 48-acre amusement park that first opened in 1963 and has since gained a reputation as one of the best kids’ theme parks in the world.
In Pennsylvania’s Dutch Wonderland, there are more than 30 rides, including roller coasters, slides, castles, Duke’s Lagoon, a themed water park, and live concerts and performances that will delight and amuse you. Bring your little ones along this weekend—there are lots of

keep them busy.

The Dutch Wonderland
The Dutch Wonderland

The Philadelphia Zoo

The Philadelphia Zoo, being the oldest zoo in the country, should be on your list of things to do in Pennsylvania in August. Over 1,300 unique species, many of which are endangered or rare, are held there on 42 acres in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania’s Fairmount Park.

At the Philadelphia Zoo, there are a variety of creatures, including lizards, lions, primates, tigers, camels, horses, ponies, lorikeets, and more. The Amazon Rainforest Carousel and other unusual and enjoyable activities make for an interesting experience. Animals can be seen walking above you on mesh elevated pathways at the wildly popular Zoo 360 attraction!

The Philadelphia Zoo
The Philadelphia Zoo

The Weeping Glass

Why not stop by The Weeping Glass if you’re seeking more bizarre things to do in Pennsylvania?

It is a store that sells extraordinary collections of macabre and exotic curiosities and is situated in Allentown. The store is filled with numerous strange objects and has a dark, gloomy atmosphere. The Weeping Glass is home to interesting artifacts, strange items, and artefacts from countries other than Pennsylvania.

The selection includes odd paintings, odd glass-preserved objects, odd antiques, and odd animal bones and parts. A monthly event dubbed the Midnight Death Parlor also features a performer who delivers a dark, terrifying story as the audience nibbles on selected food and drinks themed cocktails. Additionally, you may attend workshops on taxidermy or get a Tarot reading!

The Weeping Glass
The Weeping Glass

The Brandywine Conservancy and Museum of Art

The Brandywine Conservancy and the Museum of Art were established to save the historic significance of Pennsylvania’s Brandywine Valley against industrial expansion that would change the landscape, destroy the area’s character, and deplete its water resources. Locals bought the property in 1967 and established the Brandywine Conservancy on it.

Since its founding, it has expanded to prevent development on more than 64,500 acres of state territory and beyond, while continuing to preach about and promote responsible and sustainable land use.
The Brandywine River Museum of Art first opened its doors in 1971 and quickly established itself as one of the most well-known tourist destinations in the region. An excellent way to see a lot of wonderful vacation sites at once is to go touring along the conservancy’s grounds and then pop in to the museum.

The Brandywine Conservancy and Museum of Art
The Brandywine Conservancy and Museum of Art

The Lake Tobias Wildlife Park

J. R. Tobias founded the Lake Tobias Wildlife Park in 1965 as a hobby during his retirement. From those modest beginnings, it has developed into a well-known monument among things to do in Pennsylvania!

Tobias loved animals and farming, but he ultimately chose to pursue more realistic professional alternatives. Fortunately, he was able to use his knowledge and build the park himself thanks to the talents he acquired throughout his work.

The Lake Tobias Wildlife Park
The Lake Tobias Wildlife Park

The Lake Tobias Wildlife Park in Pennsylvania, which welcomes an amazing 180,000 visitors a year, is currently managed by six of Tobias’ children and one of his grandkids. You and your family can engage in a variety of activities here, such as safari vehicle trips outside, visiting several themed animal facilities and exhibits, visiting a 500-gallon aquarium, and more.

Thanks to its numerous diverse attractions, Pennsylvania is a great state that is ideal for a trip. With the aid of this travel guide, you should be able to locate every destination you desire in the gorgeous state of Pennsylvania in August.

Hope this article The 10 Most Fun Things To Do in Pennsylvania in August  give you more information and helps you to make the right decision.

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